December 13, 2018

Published December 13, 2018 by Ad-Vinylrecords with 0 comment

Prince - Controversy (1981) - Lp

















Release:  1981
Genre:  Pop, Funk
Format:  LP
Label:  Warner Bros. Records
Catalog#  WB 56950
Prijs:  €10,00


Controversy is the fourth studio album by American recording artist Prince, released on October 14, 1981 by Warner Bros. Records. It was produced by Prince, written (with the exception of one track) by him, and he also performed most of the instruments on its recording.

Controversy continues in the same vein of new wave-tinged funk on Dirty Mind, emphasizing Prince's fascination with synthesizers and synthesizing disparate pop music genres. It is also more ambitious than its predecessor, attempting to tackle social protest ("Controversy," "Ronnie, Talk to Russia," "Annie Christian") along with sex songs ("Jack U Off," "Sexuality"), and it tries hard to bring funk to a rock audience and vice versa. Even with all of Prince's ambitions, the music on Controversy doesn't represent a significant breakthrough from Dirty Mind, and it is often considerably less catchy and memorable.

Controversy opens with the title track, which raises questions that were being asked about Prince at the time, including his race and sexuality. The song "flirts with blasphemy" by including a chant of The Lord's Prayer. "Do Me, Baby" is an "extended bump-n-grind" ballad with explicitly sexual lyrics, and "Ronnie, Talk to Russia" is a politically charged plea to President Ronald Reagan. "Private Joy" is a bouncy bubblegum pop-funk tune, "showing off Prince's lighter side", followed by "Annie Christian", which lists historical events such as the murder of African-American children in Atlanta and the death of John Lennon. The album's final song, "Jack U Off", is a synthesized rockabilly-style track.
This was the first of his albums to associate Prince with the color purple as well as the first to use sensational spelling in his song titles.


Side A
A1. Controversy - 7:15
A2. Sexuality - 4:21
A3. Do Me, Baby - 7:43

Side B
B1. Private Joy - 4:29
B2. Ronnie, Talk to Russia - 1:58
B3. Let’s Work - 3:54
B4. Annie Christian - 4:22
B5. Jack U Off - 3:09

Vinyl:  Goed
Cover:  Goed
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December 05, 2018

Published December 05, 2018 by Ad-Vinylrecords with 0 comment

The Eagles - Hotel California (1976) - Lp

















Release: 1976
Genre:  Country Rock
Format:  LP
Label:  Asylum Records
Catalog#  AS 53051
Prijs:  €10,00


Hotel California is the fifth studio album by American rock band the Eagles, and is one of the best-selling albums of all time. Three singles were released from the album, each reaching high in the Billboard Hot 100: "New Kid in Town", "Hotel California", and "Life in the Fast Lane".

The Eagles took 18 months between their fourth and fifth albums, reportedly spending eight months in the studio recording Hotel California.
The album was also their first to be made without Bernie Leadon, who had given the band much of its country flavor, and with rock guitarist Joe Walsh. As a result, the album marks a major leap for the Eagles from their earlier work, as well as a stylistic shift toward mainstream rock. An even more important aspect, however, is the emergence of Don Henley as the band's dominant voice, both as a singer and a lyricist.

On the six songs to which he contributes, Henley sketches a thematic statement that begins by using California as a metaphor for a dark, surreal world of dissipation; comments on the ephemeral nature of success and the attraction of excess; branches out into romantic disappointment; and finally sketches a broad, pessimistic history of America that borders on nihilism.
Of course, the lyrics kick in some time after one has appreciated the album's music, which marks a peak in the Eagles' playing. Early on, the group couldn't rock convincingly, but the rhythm section of Henley and Meisner has finally solidified, and the electric guitar work of Don Felder and Joe Walsh has arena-rock heft.

In the early part of their career, the Eagles never seemed to get a sound big enough for their ambitions; after changes in producer and personnel, as well as a noticeable growth in creativity, Hotel California unveiled what seemed almost like a whole new band. It was a band that could be bombastic, but also one that made music worthy of the later tag of "classic rock," music appropriate for the arenas and stadiums the band was playing.
The result was the Eagles' biggest-selling regular album release, and one of the most successful rock albums ever.


Side A
A1. Hotel California - 6:30
A2. New Kid in Town - 5:03
A3. Life in the Fast Lane - 4:46
A4. Wasted Time - 4:55

Side B
B1. Wasted Time (Reprise)” (instrumental) - 1:22
B2. Victim of Love - 4:11
B3. Pretty Maids All in a Row - 3:58
B4. Try and Love Again - 5:10
B5. The Last Resort - 7:28

Album:  Goed
Cover:  zijkant licht beschadigd
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